Date on Master's Thesis/Doctoral Dissertation

12-2007

Document Type

Master's Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Pan-African Studies

Degree Program

Pan-African Studies, MA

Committee Chair

Douglas, Robert L.

Committee Member

Hudson, Blaine

Committee Member

Jones, Ricky

Committee Member

Burton, Nefertiti

Subject

Racism--Religious aspects

Abstract

This critical inquiry into the social constructions of "black" and "white" identities analyzes the roles of the three "western" monotheisms (Judaism, Christianity and Islam) in the cognitive and sociohistorical developments of racial slavery and antiblack racism. Specifically, it investigates the sociohistorical consequences of the inherent dualisms of the "western" monotheisms and how those dualisms are expressed in the production of social theories and systems that rely on believer/non-believer oppositions and binaries defined by a Manichaean view of the universe and a teleological conception of history that fosters and sustains an eternal holy war against infidels. What emerges from this analysis in the end is a reconnection of Islam with Judeo-Christianity, resulting in the (re)formulation of a Judeo-Christian-Islamic complex as a specific instrumentality in the formation of "white" and "black" identities and the creation and preservation of white supremacy.

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