Date on Master's Thesis/Doctoral Dissertation

8-2015

Document Type

Doctoral Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph. D.

Department (Legacy)

Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology, Counseling, and College Student Personnel

Department

Counseling and Human Development

Degree Program

Counseling and Personnel Services, PhD

Committee Chair

Leach, Mark

Committee Member

Possel, Patrick

Committee Member

Hardesty, Patrick

Committee Member

Richardson, George

Subject

Prayer--Social aspects; Faith--Social aspects; Religion and culture; Experience (Religion)--Social aspects

Abstract

This study explores the mediating effect of one’s perceived relationship with God on the relationship between prayer and mental health in a cultural context. As an interpersonal activity, prayer may operate along relational constructs. Research supports a theoretical mechanism of prayer that aligns with the benefits of supportive interpersonal relationships. It is possible, then, that as relational processes change across dimensions of individualism and collectivism, prayer may mirror these same changes. A model for collectivistic and individualistic approaches to prayer is proposed and placed within a relational model for prayer’s effects on mental health. However, due to instrument failure, the hypotheses were not testable. The construct validity of the Inward, Outward, Upward Prayer scale is called into question and further research into taxonomies of prayer is encouraged.

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