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The University of Louisville Journal of Respiratory Infections

Authors

Julio A. Ramirez, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Infectious DiseasesFollow
Stephen P. Furmanek, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Infectious DiseasesFollow
Thomas Chandler, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Infectious DiseasesFollow
Stephen S. Hanson, Tulane University, Department of Family and Community MedicineFollow
Dawn Balcom, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Infectious DiseasesFollow
Subathra Marimuthu, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Infectious DiseasesFollow
Sathya Krishnasamy, University of Louisville, School of Medicine EndocrinologyFollow
Jose Bordon, Washington Health Institute, George Washington University Medical SchoolFollow
Rodrigo Cavallazzi, University of Louisville, School of Medicine PulmonologyFollow
Amr Aboelnasr, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Infectious DiseasesFollow
Mahder A. Tella, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Infectious DiseasesFollow
William A. Mattingly, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Infectious DiseasesFollow
Ashley M. Wilde, Norton Healthcare, Norton Medical GroupFollow
Daisy Sangroula, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Anesthesiology and Perioperative MedicineFollow
Demetra Antimisiaris, University of Louisville, Frazier Polypharmacy and Medication Management Program, Continuing Medical Education & Professional DevelopmentFollow
Donghoon Chung, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Microbiology & ImmunologyFollow
Guillermo CabralFollow
Gabino R Fernandez-Botran, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Pathology and Laboratory MedicineFollow
Jiapeng Huang, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Anesthesiology and Perioperative MedicineFollow
Martin GnoniFollow
Ozan Akca, University of Louisville, School of Medicine, Anesthesiology & Perioperative MedicineFollow
Paul Schulz, Norton Healthcare, Norton Medical GroupFollow
Phillip F. Bressoud, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Department of MedicineFollow
Priya Krishnan, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Department of MedicineFollow
Sally Suliman, University of Louisville, School of Medicine PulmonologyFollow
William P. McKinney, University of Louisville, School of Public Health and Information SciencesFollow
Bryan Moffett, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Department of MedicineFollow
Leslie A Wolf, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Infectious DiseasesFollow
Mark Burns, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Infectious DiseasesFollow
Alex Glynn, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Infectious DiseasesFollow
Ruth Carrico, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Infectious DiseasesFollow
Forest W. Arnold, University of Louisville, School of Medicine Infectious DiseasesFollow

Abstract

Introduction: Current literature indicates that African American individuals are at increased risk of becoming infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus and suffer higher SARS-CoV-2-related mortality rates. However, there is a lack of consensus as to how the clinical outcomes of African American patients differ from those of other groups. The objective of this study was to define the clinical outcomes of African American and White hospitalized patients with SARS-CoV-2 community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Louisville, Kentucky.

Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of hospitalized patients with SARS-CoV-2 CAP at eight hospitals in Louisville, Kentucky. Severity of CAP at time of hospitalization was evaluated using the pneumonia severity index (PSI), CURB-65 score and SARS-CoV-2 viral load. The following thirteen clinical outcomes were compared: discharge alive to home, time to home discharge, admission to the ICU, length of ICU stay, need for invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), duration of IMV, development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), development of septic shock, need for vasopressors, development of cardiovascular events, time to cardiovascular events, in-hospital mortality, and time to death.

Results: A total of 541 patients were eligible for this study, 343 White (63%) and 198 African American (37%). None of the thirteen clinical outcomes were statistically significantly different between the two groups.

Conclusions: This study indicates that African American and White patients do not have different clinical outcomes after the point of hospitalization due to SARS-CoV-2 CAP.

Funder

The author(s) received no specific funding for this work

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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